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2014 1E2 Group 8 - Anaemia

Page history last edited by 2014class1e2group8 5 years, 7 months ago

 Team members

 

Names / Roles:

  • Kai Jie (22)(Leader)
  • Sherman(31)(Editor)
  • Hadi(30)(Researcher)
  • None(Researcher)

 

 


Meaning / Definition

Anaemia means that having fewer red blood cells than normal,or having less haemoglobin than normal in each red blood cell.In either case,a reduced amount of oxygen is carried around in the bloodstream.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cP72MVAcpC4(Anemia Video)Please click on the link.

 


Causes and Effects

Causes 

 

  1. Anemia caused by blood loss 
  2. Anemia caused by decreased or faulty red blood cell production
  3. Anemia caused by destruction of red blood cells

 

Effects

  1. Red blood cells can be lost through bleeding, which can occur slowly over a long period of time, and can often go undetected. This kind of chronic bleeding commonly results from the following:
  • Gastrointestinal conditions such as ulcers, haemorrhoids , gastritis (inflammation of the stomach), and cancer
  • Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin or ibuprofen, which can cause ulcers and gastritis
  • Menstruation and childbirth in women, especially if menstrual bleeding is excessive and if there are multiple pregnancies

 

 

     2.With this type of anemia, the body may produce too few blood cells or the blood cells may not function correctly. In either case, anemia can result. Red blood cells may be faulty or decreased due to abnormal red blood cells or a lack of minerals and vitamins needed for red blood cells to work properly. Conditions associated with these causes of anemia include the following:

  • Sickle cell anemia
  • Iron-deficiency anemia
  • Vitamin deficiency
  • Bone marrow and stem cell problems
  • Other health conditions

Sickle cell anemia is an inherited disorder that affects African-Americans. Red blood cells become crescent-shaped because of a genetic defect. They break down rapidly, so oxygen does not get to the body's organs, causing anemia. The crescent-shaped red blood can cells also get stuck in tiny blood vessels, causing pain.

 

 

 


Signs and Symptoms

  • Fatigue
  • Pale skin
  • A fast or irregular heartbeat
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chest pain
  • Dizziness
  • Cognitive problems
  • Cold hands and feet
  • Headache

 

 

 

 


Prevention and Treatment

The treatment of the anemia varies greatly. First, the underlying cause of the anemia should be identified and corrected. For example, anemia as a result of blood loss from a stomach ulcer should begin with medications to heal the ulcer. Likewise, surgery is often necessary to remove a colon cancer that is causing chronic blood loss and anemia.

Sometimes iron supplements will also be needed to correct iron deficiency. In severe anemia, blood transfusions may be necessary. Vitamin B12 injections will be necessary for patients suffering from pernicious anemia or other causes of B12 deficiency.

In certain patients with bone marrow disease (or bone marrow damage from chemotherapy) or patients with kidney failure, epoetin alfa (Procrit, Epogen) may be used to stimulate bone marrow red blood cell production.

 

 

 

 


 

Link to Other Illnesses or Diseases

Conditions that can lead to anemia of chronic disease include:

  • Autoimmune disorders, such as Crohn's disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and ulcerative colitis
  • Cancer, including lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease
  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Liver cirrhosis
  • Long-term infections, such as bacterial endocarditis, osteomyelitis (bone infection), HIV/AIDS,hepatitis B or hepatitis C

 

 

 


References

Plagiarism is a strongly discouraged.

 

http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/anemia/

http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/understanding-anemia-basics

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/anemia/basics/symptoms/con-20026209

http://www.medscape.org/viewarticle/537098_3

http://www.emedicalguild.com/anemia-treatment-how-to-treat-anemia-with-drugs-medication/

http://www.medindia.net/patients/patientinfo/anemia.htm

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000565.htm

 

 

 

 

 

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